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Russia

 

Please take the time to enjoy a small selection of the artifacts that we have on display at the Museum of World War II. Every artifact in our collection has its own history, and ties to human lives. Each artifact has a small section of its story told here.

You can use this map to jump to any section of the Museum of World War 2 to view a selection of the artifacts displayed there.

You can click any image for a larger view.

This section contains artifacts specifically about Russia, and Russia's invlovement in World War II.  Though relatively small in area compared to its significance and scope in the war, this section contains the German maps and reconnaissance books for the invasion of the Soviet Union, highly important letters of Stalin, letters of Zhukov and Khrushchev, relics of Stalingrad, including a German soldier's winter outfit, a complete collection of Russian guns, and a series of outstanding posters. Click on each image for a larger view.

Map of the Museum

 

Though relatively small in area compared to its significance and scope in the war, this section contains the German maps and reconnaissance books for the invasion of the Soviet Union, highly important letters of Stalin, letters of Zhukov and Khrushchev, relics of Stalingrad, including a German soldier's winter outfit, a complete collection of Russian guns, and a series of outstanding posters.
 
Soviet artifacts, including a German training model of the Russian T-34 tank and autograph manuscripts signed by Joseph Stalin, Georgi Zhukov, Nikita Khrushchev, and Vyachlesav Molotov.
 
SOVIET ANTI-NAZI PROPAGANDA POSTERS
 
German Anti-Soviet Poster
 
Artifacts from the Battle of Stalingrad.
 
JOSEPH STALIN, signed photograph in Georgian, to Comrade Tamara. GEORGI ZHUKOV, November 16, 1940. As Commandant of the Kiev Military Zone and General of the Army, Zhukov reports "to comrades of the Red Army, Commanding Officers, and Political Workers" on the economic and cultural state and development of the Soviet Union on the 23rd anniversary "of the great socialist October revolution."
 
V. MOLOTOV, December 13, 1939, notes and signature on a report of a Swedish newspaper entitled, "The Captive Polish Women and Men Ahead of the Attacking Russian Troops." December 13, 1939. Soviet propaganda leaflet to German soldiers
 
NIKITA KHRUSHCHEV, letter, January, 1944: "I wish you every success in the struggle against the enemies of our Motherland--the German invaders."
 
JOSEPH STALIN,

Moscow, November 13, 1942:
"I am answering the questions you sent me on November 12:

'1. How does the Soviet side assess the Allied campaign in Africa?'

Answer. The Soviet side regards this campaign as a significant fact of great import which demonstrates the growing power of the Allied forces and opens a perspective of the disintegration of the Italo-German coalition in a short time. The campaign in Africa once again refutes the skeptics who claim that the English-American leadership is incapable of organizing a serious military operation. There may be no doubt that only first-class organizers could carry out such major military operations as the successful ocean landings in North Africa, the rapid conquests of ports and further territory from Casablanca to Beja├»a, and the brilliantly executed destruction of the Italo-German forces in the western desert. 
2. 'How effective is this campaign in regard to reducing pressure on the Soviet Union and what further assistance does the Soviet Union expect?'

Answer. It is still too early to speak of the effectiveness of this campaign in regard to the reduction of military pressure on the Soviet Union. But it can be said with conviction that the effect will not be small and that this lessening of pressure on the Soviet Union will set in very shortly. But that is not the only thing. Primarily it means that inasmuch as the campaign in Africa signifies a transition of the initiative in the hands of our allies, it changes the military and political situation in Europe fundamentally to the advantage of the English-Soviet-American coalition. It undermines the authority of Hitler's Germany as the leading power in the system of states of the Axis Powers and demoralizes Hitler's European allies. It brings France out of her state of paralysis, mobilizes France's anti-Hitler factions and forms a basis for the organization of a French army against Hitler. It creates the preconditions for luring Italy out of its alliance and isolating Hitler's Germany. Finally, it creates the preconditions for organizing a second European front nearer the vital centers of Germany, which will take on crucial importance in organizing the victory over Hitler's tyranny.
3. 'How great is the probability of a uniting of Soviet offensive forces in the East with the Allies in the West to speed up the final victory?'

Answer. There can be no doubt that the Red Army is fulfilling its task with honor, just as it has done during the entire war."


 
GERMAN INVASION PLANS
German invasion plans of the Soviet Union,  and artifacts from the Battle of Stalingrad. Moscow
 
The German invasion plans include photographs of principle Russian cities. Moscow is shown here. Leningrad
 
Moscow Russian card of German soldier wanted for atrocities
 
Soviet Maxim,the standard heavy machinegun Soviet submachine guns.
 
Soviet PPSh41, the standard submachine gun used by Soviet troops throughout the war.